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Article
July 3, 1897

GENERAL MEDICINE A SPECIALTY IN ITSELF; ITS RELATION TO THE RECOGNIZED SPECIALTIES, PARTICULARLY TO BACTERIOLOGY.

Author Affiliations

President of the Obstetrical, Gynecological and Pediatric Society; Professor of Diseases of Children, Columbian University; Senior Physician Washington City Orphan Asylum; Member of Attending Staff, Department of General Diseases Central Dispensary and Emergency Hospital, etc. WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(1):3-4. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440270003001a

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Abstract

I wish to urge upon you, as forcibly as I can, that the time has come when we should claim with all our energy that the department of medicine in which we are engaged (the noblest of all the divisions of the science, because the most comprehensive, and calling into play the intellectual faculties as none other can possibly do), is, and of right should be, a specialty in itself, claiming not only recognition from the "manipulative" (or otherwise limited), recognized specialties, but occupying toward them the position of a parent to children—a fostering care which they can not do without, unless they are content to be relegated to the domain of sciolism and quackery. These are strong expressions, but not too emphatic for the occasion. A brilliant medical man, of admirable attainment in the theory of medicine, of thorough hospital training and very considerable experience in private practice, told

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