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Article
November 14, 1896

HIGH PRESSURE PROCESS OF TEACHING IN OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS CONSIDERED FROM A MEDICAL STANDPOINT.

Author Affiliations

LA GRANGE, IND.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(20):1034-1035. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430980006001c

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Abstract

There are different temperaments and organizations in our school children, and of necessity it would be impossible to adopt any method of teaching that would reach all in a satisfactory manner; no one course or routine would be perfectly satisfactory to the highly nervous child and apply equally to the lymphatic and sanguine temperament. But we ought to be able to so conduct our schools that we may do the greatest good to the whole number.

Our present school system is a high pressure process with a constant tendency to add more branches, so that little children have five or six studies and with department method, as many teachers. Children of eight or nine years of age are urged to high intellectual effort and are expected to master studies which a few years ago were only attempted by children fourteen or fifteen years old. Are we thus doing the best

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