[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 10, 1897

DIET IN TYPHOID FEVER.

Author Affiliations

JACKSON PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE IN HARVARD UNIVERSITY. BOSTON, MASS.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(2):51-52. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440280003001a

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

When typhoid fever kills it does so either by perforation or exhaustion, the proportion of the former being estimated at 5 to 10 per cent. The main factors in producing the exhaustion which causes the death of at least nine-tenths of the fatal cases are toxemia, continued fever, diarrhea and vomiting and intestinal hemorrhage. The heart is ordinarily the best index of the presence and degree of exhaustion, and the most frequent serious pulmonary complication, hypostasis, in its various forms, degrees and consequences is the direct outgrowth of the cardiac weakness. Moreover typhoid fever is not short and sharp like pneumonia, but of long course, and usually attended with decided, often with very great wasting of the muscular and fatty tissues.

Most of us are agreed that we are not as yet acquainted with any therapeutic measures which will either abort or very materially shorten the course of the disease.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×