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Article
November 28, 1903

REMOVAL OF THE FAUCIAL TONSILSOME OBSERVATIONS AND A NEW METHOD OF OPERATION.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat, Chicago Policlinic. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(22):1334-1338. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490410024001d
Abstract

In reviewing the literature1 on diseases of the tonsils, it will be found that as early as 10 A. D. the medical men of that age recognized this structure as the seat of disease, for at that time the gland was operated on and completely extirpated. In the work of Celsus (10 A. D.) we find tonsillotomy spoken of as a common practice. It was accomplished either by dissecting with a bistoury or by the fingernail of the operator. Not until much later did the profession become aware of the dangers of the operation, which finally came to be considered dangerous from the fact that cases occurred in which death from hemorrhage followed. It was in the fifth century that medical writers first advocated a modified operation for the relief of enlarged glands in this region. Ætius (490 A. D.) advised the removal of only that part of the gland

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