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Article
July 10, 1897

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE HABIT OF PROGNOSIS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE INDIVIDUAL PHYSICIAN.

Author Affiliations

Late House Physician St. Luke's Hospital; Chairman of the Section on General Medicine of the New York Academy of Medicine; Secretary of the Section on State Medicine of the American Medical Association; Member of the Neurological Society, etc. NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(2):67-68. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440280019001f

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Abstract

It is the duty of a physician to himself and to his patients, not only to be well informed, but it is also to look out for new methods that tend to the best possible training for his work. Habits, good and bad, are the relentless masters of our lives and actions. Powerful as they are for evil they are equally potent for good if seized upon, developed and directed. Habits of mind and thought are just as much habits as those pertaining to the physical nature.

Now there is a particular attitude in approaching a medical case that would seem, more than almost any other, to lead to sound judgments and judicious management, the attitude that takes account of not only present conditions, but discounts them by the probable future. It not only considers what the course of disease will be, if treated, but its course if untreated or

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