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Article
November 28, 1903

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF INFECTION, HEREDITY AND PREDISPOSITION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(22):1348-1349. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.02490410038004
Abstract

It is a well-known fact that pulmonary tuberculosis is more common among the poor, the careless, the ignorant and the depraved in a community than among those belonging to the opposite class. It is likewise an authenticated observation that the disease seems to exhibit a predilection for certain houses, or rather that a disproportionate number of cases occur in such houses. The natural inference is, therefore, that special opportunities for transmission exist under such conditions, but a question has been raised as to the part played in this connection by heredity and predisposition. It has. for example, been noted that not all persons equally exposed are attacked; that certain families especially suffer, and that women are often the victims of the disease in connection with the puerperal state and lactation. Some observations have been made into the questions at issue, but they have principally related only to tuberculous patients. Accordingly,

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