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Article
February 21, 1914

THE DORSAL POSITION DURING THE PUERPERIUM AS A CAUSE OF RETROVERSIO UTERI

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Gynecology, St. Louis University School of Medicine ST. LOUIS

JAMA. 1914;LXII(8):607-608. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02560330025009
Abstract

During the year ending Aug. 1, 1913, there were 105 papers published on the subject of uterine displacements throughout the world.1 Of all these papers, only one-half of one paper was devoted to the etiology of these conditions (other than obstetric injuries). These papers represent a tremendous amount of work. Practically every paper mentioned the injuries incident to delivery as causative factors, but other causes were ignored. The subject of posterior displacements without obstetric injuries to the genitalia was scarcely mentioned. The literature classifies the causes of the above-mentioned condition about as follows:

  1. Congenital lack of ligamentary tone throughout the body.

  2. Pelvic inflammatory trouble, followed by adhesions.

  3. Extreme distention of bladder and rectum, pushing cervix forward and fundus backward.

A very few authors (gynecologists, not obstetricians) are now adding a fourth cause, "the dorsal position during the puerperium."

Both permanent and movable displacements receive their chief impetus in the

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