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Article
February 21, 1914

ANASTOMOSIS OF THE FACIAL AND HYPOGLOSSAL NERVES FOR FACIAL PARALYSIS

Author Affiliations

San Francisco

JAMA. 1914;LXII(8):612-613. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02560330030013
Abstract

Surgeon Chief of Otology, San Francisco Polyclinic; Otologic, Rhinologic and Laryngologic Surgeon, St. Mary's Hospital, and City and County Hospital; Consulting Otologic, Rhinologic and Laryngologic Surgeon, German Hospital

Patient.  —J. T., a man, aged 23, was shot in the right ear in September, 1909. Patient was in a local hospital for one month after he was hurt because of intense vertigo, nausea and vomiting. Facial paralysis was observed on the day following the accident.

Examination (September, 1910).  —Face: complete paralysis. On the injured side the eye cannot be closed; cheek muscles are flabby, all lines obliterated, and forehead smooth (Fig. 1); mouth is drawn to the opposite side. The condition is accentuated when patient smiles (Fig. 2). No response to either faradic or galvanic current. No nystagmus or vertigo. Ear: Foul discharge, the meatus considerably contracted from the gunshot wound. The scar is about a quarter of an inch within

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