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Article
December 5, 1903

I. PROLONGED INTUBATION. II. ESOPHAGOTOMY FOR A DENTAL PLATE. III. LARYNGECTOMY FOR CARCINOMA.

Author Affiliations

CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF OTOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF BUFFALO BUFFALO, N. Y.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(23):1410-1412. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490420028003a
Abstract

I.—A CASE OF PROLONGED INTUBATION.  One of the rarest accidents following intubation for diphtheria is stenosis, which results from pressure ulceration of the subglottic region and is very difficult to remedy. There are, perhaps, half a dozen cases on record; several made complete recoveries. One of these is as follows:

Intubation.  —Rosa McGlynn, aged 6, was taken sick with diphtheria in December, 1901, and in a very few days required intubation. Being otherwise engaged, I sent my assistant, Dr. James E. King, to perform the operation. A week later the tube was removed, but had to be replaced immediately. Several days thereafter I removed the tube, but within a very few minutes had to replace it. This occurred frequently for several weeks. In order to keep better watch of the child I had her removed to the Riverside Hospital, and there the tube was removed and replaced off and on for

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