[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 31, 1897

THE PERSONAL EQUATION AMONG TRAINMEN OF EQUAL OR GREATER IMPORTANCE THAN VISUAL POWER OR COLOR SENSE.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(5):229. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440310027001i

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

After having one day examined a few locomotive engineers for visual power and the color sense in particular, I felt considerably dissatisfied and asked myself the question, what is the object of these examinations? The answer came immediately: To avoid accidents by the elimination of men with visual defects. Another question presented itself: But is this—the condition of the color sense and the visual power relative to form—all that can afford us information relative to the aptitude of the individual to perceive quickly and respond with judgment? Emphatically, no. There is another phenomenon, or rather several phenomena, the observation of which would add much greater certainty to our work and more personal satisfaction in its contemplation. These several phenomena consist of the time taken for the sensation to be carried from the retina through the optic nerve to the cortical substance of the brain; the time taken for comparison and

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×