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Article
August 7, 1897

CHRONIC INFLAMMATION AND ULCERATION OF THE DUODENUM, WITH RESULTANT REFLEXES.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND PRESIDENT UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE, KANSAS CITY, MO. LIBERTY, MO.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(6):262-264. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440320006001b

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Abstract

The duodenum is abundantly supplied with arterial blood. Its veins empty into the portal vein, any obstruction of which, either from the lungs, liver or heart, produces passive congestion of this organ. Its nervous connection with the brain is by branches from the par vagum and with the spinal cord by branches from it, with the sympathetic system by branches from the solar plexus, and with the thoracic plexus by the splanchnic nerve. It has within its structure the plexus of Meisner and Auerbach. It is studded with the glands of Lieberkühn and Brunner, and with solitary glands as well as lymphatics. It is the physiologic receptacle of the chyme which is often perverted by functional disease of the stomach or over-repletion, either of which may be highly irritating to the duodenum. It also receives the secretion from the liver and pancreas and performs, possibly, as important a function in

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