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Article
August 7, 1897

FRACTURES OF THE SKULL AND INJURIES TO THE BRAIN.

Author Affiliations

SURGEON TO THE JOHNSTONE EMERGENCY HOSPITAL. MILWAUKEE, WIS.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(6):276-277. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440320020001j

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Abstract

Case 1.  —B. F., German, age 35 years, book agent; was brought into the Emergency May 1, 1897, about midnight: unconscious, right motor hemiplegia, respiration labored and irregular and of Cheyne-Stokes character, hemorrhage from right ear. Pulse 70, full and stong, indicating cerebral compression; temperature, 97 degrees; by next morning it had arisen to 100.2 degrees and pulse to 98; respirations, 26.History: About 10 P.M., while intoxicated, fell down stairs and was not found until about midnight. I saw him the following morning in the above-stated condition.Examination: The scalp was very greatly swollen, so much so that it was impossible to make out the condition of the skull underlying this tumefaction. There were no marks of injury upon the scalp. An oblong edema extended from a little distance behind the bregma on the right side of the head downward and backward to the apex of the mastoid process.

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