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Article
April 4, 1914

CONSERVATIVE OPERATIVE TREATMENT OF LONG-STANDING INVERSION OF THE UTERUS

JAMA. 1914;LXII(14):1061-1063. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02560390001001
Abstract

From the time of Hippocrates, who wrote clearly of this condition, to the modern era, inversion of the uterus was treated principally by elevation of the lower part of the body and pressure on the protruding mass — that is, by posture and taxis. At first, posture seems to have been most emphasized, while later taxis, in its various forms, was more largely depended on.

In the long-standing cases, however, this treatment was only occasionally successful. Most of the women who survived the primary shock and the hemorrhage of the first few months dragged out a miserable existence, and finally succumbed to anemia or chronic sepsis. The repeated and prolonged taxis, so persistently employed, often aggravated the symptoms and hastened the end.

As early as 50 B. C., Themison suggested amputation of the bleeding and sloughing corpus uteri, stating that he did not believe that the uterus was essential to

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