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Article
December 19, 1903

AN EIGHTY-EIGHT POUND OVARIAN CYST SUCCESSFULLY REMOVED FROM A PATIENT SEVENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF AGE.

Author Affiliations

Formerly Resident Gynecologist, the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Instructor in Gynecology, the Johns Hopkins University. DETROIT.

JAMA. 1903;XLI(25):1539-1540. doi:10.1001/jama.1903.92490440029002

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Abstract

In these days of operative activity, ovarian tumors weighing more than fifty pounds are sufficiently uncommon to attract attention. The mortality of the operation being so small, and the zeal of the surgeons so great, we no longer see the enormous cysts, which in the earlier days were comparatively frequent.

There being several minor points in the following case, both in the physical signs and in the after-treatment, I feel justified in reporting it in full.

History.  —Mrs. M. S. entered Johns Hopkins Hospital March 23, 1903. She was barely able to stand or walk alone on account of a large abdominal tumor, and the infirmity of her age, which was asserted by her companion to be 77 years. She was of Irish descent, illiterate, and had lived for many years in the slums of Baltimore.

Present Trouble.  —As far as could be ascertained

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