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Article
November 28, 1896

LITHOLAPAXY; SUCCESSFUL REMOVAL, FROM THE BLADDER OF A MAN 30 YEARS OLD, OF A WILLOW TWIG 7 INCHES LONG, WITH HEAVY INCRUSTATION OF CALCIUM PHOSPHATE.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY, JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE; CLINICAL SURGEON TO JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(22):1145-1146. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02431000021002e
Abstract

In the month of September, 1895, I was called in consultation in Johnstown by Dr. A. N. Wakefield and Dr. F. Shill, to see a man about 30 years of age, who stated that he had gravel. The man showed us a small piece of willow twig, half an inch long and about the thickness of an ordinary match, incrusted for half its length with phosphate of lime making the mass one-quarter of an inch in diameter. He had passed this piece of twig from his bladder within a week, also two smaller pieces during the month of January last. He said that in November, 1895, he had shoved up in his urethra a long piece of willow twig and that it had accidently broken off at the head of his penis. As is usually the case with foreign bodies in the urethra, this willow twig had been carried by

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