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Article
November 28, 1896

THE DOCTORATE ADDRESS DELIVERED AT THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE ILLINOIS MEDICAL COLLEGE.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Diseases of the Nose, Throat and Ear; Professor of Otology in the Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital; Surgeon to the Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, etc.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(22):1148-1149. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02431000024002h

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Abstract

Members of the Graduating Class: In conferring the degree of Doctor of Medicine upon you to-day, the honor and privileges conveyed with the title are not likely to be underestimated or forgotten. But you should be reminded that in accepting the privileges of physicians, you assume at the same time duties of the gravest nature. Your relations to the members of the community who will entrust themselves to your care are changed. Such relations become as sacred and inviolable as those existing between priest and parishioner—between lawyer and client. Your duties will involve an intimate knowledge of their affairs, their habits and their characters, such as no other professional relation in life conveys.

Our laws recognize, protect and dignify this high position which is maintained by every honorable physician. In the safety vaults of your memories will be treasured those confidences and secrets that are poured, confession-like, into every Doctor's

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