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Article
April 25, 1914

A CASE OF SO-CALLED "RENAL DIABETES," POSSIBLY TRAUMATIC IN ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Clinical Research, Michael Reese Hospital.

JAMA. 1914;LXII(17):1301-1304. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02560420007003
Abstract

The relations between the kidney and sugar excretion form interesting chapters in the study of diabetes and of less well-known glycosurias. The general conception that the kidney is practically passive in diabetes has been disputed. In 1897 Lépine1 reported the case of a woman dying in coma, whose blood contained 1.6 per cent, sugar and whose kidneys were enormous and showed a high grade of interstitial inflammation. Richter,2 in 1900, in a critical review of the relation between kidney and glycosuria, concluded that renal diseases may have a favorable effect on glycosuria, and that in kidney diseases the permeability of the renal filter to sugar seemed diminished. Von Noorden3 also considers that a diseased kidney shows a diminished permeability to sugar.

Weiland4 has shown that in cases of acute nephritis the blood-sugar level is low, and in chronic interstitial nephritis it reaches the upper limits of

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