[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.92.239.248. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 2, 1914

THE CULTIVATION OF TISSUE CELLS IN VITRO AND ITS PRACTICAL APPLICATION

Author Affiliations

Thomas A. Scott Fellow in Hygiene, University of Pennsylvania WAYNE, PA.

From the Laboratory of Hygiene, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Medicine.

JAMA. 1914;LXII(18):1377-1381. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02560430007004
Abstract

In 1901, Leo Loeb1 published an account of the cultivation of epithelial cells from the guinea-pig embryo. He embedded bits of epithelium in solidified blocks of agar or serum and then planted these in subcutaneous pockets of adult guinea-pigs, from which they were excised at stated intervals, embedded in celloidin and sectioned serially. He thus used the adult pig as a living incubator of constant temperature with a constant flow of fresh sterile nourishment. He found that epithelium can grow without the presence of connective or other tissue, but in the absence of connective tissue, epithelial growth seems to be self-limited with no development of normal formations.

The first reports of the cultivation of animal tissues outside of the body were those made by R. G. Harrison2 in 1907 and again in 1910. He cultivated successfully bits of nervous tissue, using the excised medullary folds from early frog

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×