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Article
May 9, 1914

PALLIATIVE EFFECT OF ARTIFICIAL PNEUMOTHORAX IN TREATMENT OF PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

Visiting Physician, Mt. Zion Hospital; Clinician, San Francisco Tuberculosis Clinic; Medical Director, Oaks Sanatorium, Los Gatos SAN FRANCISCOm

JAMA. 1914;LXII(19):1450-1453. doi:10.1001/jama.1914.02560440006002
Abstract

Artificial pneumothorax or lung compression has assumed its place as an important factor in pulmonary therapy. Murriston Davies designates it as the greatest present-day advance in lung surgery. Phthisiotherapists, with a few ultraconservative exceptions, are beginning to look on it as the greatest addition to their armamentarium since Koch's discovery of tuberculin. So important has it become that several articles have appeared during the past three years as to who should be given priority for its discovery.

Forlanini, in a comprehensive monograph,1 states that Carson (an English physician) in 1843, himself in 1881, and Murphy in 1898, each independently of the other's work, gave birth to the idea of placing a badly diseased lung at rest by compression with gas. Forlanini, as far as I can ascertain from a scrutiny of the literature on the subject, must be credited with the idea of performing artificial pneumothorax "medically" instead of

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