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January 9, 1904

THE INFLUENCE OF BURNS ON THE ANIMAL ORGANISM.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(2):103. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02490470031006
Abstract

While it is recognized that the animal organism can be subjected to moderate elevation of temperature, for not too long a period, without directly deleterious effects, it is equally appreciated that there is danger from great elevation, particularly if long continued. It is believed that, in consequence of the latter, changes take place in the blood and the other tissues incompatible with the maintenance of life. Such changes must occur, at least locally, in exaggerated degree in burns, and a more intimate knowledge of the processes resulting under such circumstances may throw light on those attending the febrile state.

Among the phenomena that have been observed in the sequence of burns of the surface of the body are morphologic alterations in the red blood corpuscles, even to the point of complete destruction; escape of the hemoglobin of the erythrocytes into the blood plasma; partial formation of small thrombi, causing ulceration,

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