[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 16, 1904

THE TREND OF MODERN PSYCHIATRY AND ITS RELATION TO GENERAL MEDICINE.

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(3):156-161. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490480018001f
Abstract

Amid the kaleidoscopic changes incident to modern medical progress, none are more conspicuous and striking than those which pertain to the study of psychiatry. To the average practitioner medical psychology was until within a very recent period, a sealed book, and even to-day its study is greatly neglected by many of our medical schools and colleges.

This indifference is well understood, however, when we remember the hypothetical character of former available knowledge concerning morbid psychical phenomena, as well as the difficulties which beset its practical clinical application in general medical practice. Moreover the numerous exigencies that belong to the care, management and treatment of the insane soon led the general practitioner to lose interest in its study, and all such cases were willingly referred by him to those members of our profession whose tastes or opportunities led them to select this form of practice, hence, the alienist became through sheer

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×