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October 16, 1897

THE PROGRESS OF THE INDIVIDUAL CUP MOVEMENT, ESPECIALLY AMONG CHURCHES.

Author Affiliations

LECTURER AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR ON PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS, MEDICO-CHIRURGICAL COLLEGE; PHYSICIAN TO THE SAMARITAN HOSPITAL. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(16):789-794. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440420023002h
Abstract

"Prove all things; hold fast that which is good," is apostolic advice too often and incorrectly applied to good things that are old; whereas, its obvious application is to things that are new. Not, indeed, should it be inferred that beneficent things ought to be despised, neglected, or indifferently treated because they are old, but, with a growing spirit of liberty and progressiveness of thought and effort so characteristically evident, that all things should be proved, good things should be held fast, while those which are bad should be cast away. Instinct and automatism avail nothing here.

The Pauline exhortation has fittingly been followed in the approach of our theme to its present point in several ways: principles, facts and figures constitute a substantial tripod for the support of a growing sanitary triumph wherever they may be accepted and utilized for their worth and adaptability.

The promiscuous and common use

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