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Article
January 23, 1904

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF VISUAL DISTURBANCES IN BRAIN INJURY.

Author Affiliations

Adjunct Professor of Ophthalmology and Clinical Ophthalmology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, the School of Medicine of the University of Illinois; Assistant Surgeon (Eye Department) Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(4):216-221. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490490001002
Abstract

NARRATION OF CASE.1 

Hospital Record.2  —Fred. L., was brought by patrol about 9:30 p. m., Feb. 11, 1899, with gunshot wound in the left temple, one and one-half inches back of left eye, one-half inch above zygoma (Fig. 1), the revolver having been held within a few feet of the head. Examination found the patient pale, pulse slow and full, pupils moderately dilated, cold perspiration, no focal symptoms (?); a round hole with edges blackened and inverted in the location above described. Hemorrhage severe. Can not find bullet by palpation. Next day found bullet had flattened against side of the skull, and was removed (?) by Dr. C. within a few minutes after the injury. Patient was unconscious for about 14 days; had partial aphonia.No convulsions at any time. Summary of the pulse rate and temperature: During his hospital residence his temperature was above normal only on two occasions:

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