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Article
February 3, 1906

THE LOCALIZATION OF THE HIGHER PSYCHIC FUNCTIONS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE PREFRONTAL LOBE.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neurology in the University of Pennsylvania; Neurologist to the Philadelphia General Hospital.; Instructor in Neurology and Neuropathology in the University of Pennsylvania; Assistant Neurologist to the Philadelphia General Hospital. PHILADELPHIA.

From the Department of Neurology and the Laboratory of Neuropathology, University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(5):337-341. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510320023001e
Abstract

Cerebral localization had several epochs during the nineteenth century. At its dawn the views of Gall had awakened interest not only in the scientific world, but in all the European centers of population. Gall had boldly advanced the idea that the brain was not only subdivided into centers of special function, but that these were indicated on the outside of the head by peculiar prominences and conformations. An essential element of his phrenology was the existence of cranial salients, recognizable by the skilled fingers of the examiner, and constituting the ectal correlatives of ental physiologic centers in the brain substance. The bumps of the phrenologist represented gyres and subgyres, in which resided, as in the compartments of an elaborately arranged house, the habitants of the soul or mind.

Gall, who was a worker as well as theorizer, eventually lost himself in mazes of his own creation, but he will at

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