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Article
November 13, 1897

THE TREATMENT OF DIPHTHERIA WITHOUT ALCOHOL, WITH REPORT OF CASES.

Author Affiliations

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(20):997-1000. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440460017002d

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Abstract

That diphtheria is an infectious disease, with a specific poison, is universally believed by the medical profession. Whether there are two forms of the disease, the result of different bacteria, is still a mooted question. I believe there are two forms. Just at present, quite as much attention is being given to the treatment as to the nature and cause of the disease. And while the war of words is still raging, and clinical reports both favor and oppose the antitoxin treatment, while judges as well as jurors disagree as to the merits and demerits of this new remedy, I find that whichever line of treatment is followed, the greater part of the medical profession still cling to the belief that alcohol, usually in the form of whisky, is a necessity. Believing that alcoholic stimulants are not necessary, but rather are injurious in diphtheria, my purpose in presenting this paper

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