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Article
January 30, 1904

PERITONEAL SALINE INFUSIONS IN ABDOMINAL OPERATIONS.A COMBINED CLINICAL AND LABORATORY STUDY OF THEIR EFFECTS.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Gynecology in the University of Pennsylvania; Instructor in Gynecology in the University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(5):281-285. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490500001001
Abstract

At the St. Paul session of the American Medical Association we presented a paper1 on "The Practical Application in Abdominal Surgery of Scientific Investigations Concerning the Function, Anatomy and Pathology of the Peritoneum1 in which the employment of infusions of normal saline solution into the peritoneal cavity after all abdominal operations was advocated. The theory as to its value was based on the proved physiologic fact that there are well-defined currents which waft minute bodies from the lower or more dependent part of the peritoneal cavity toward the diaphragm, through which they gain entrance into the retroperitoneal lymph channels, and thence into the general blood channels. Our experimental work, at that time, had been confined solely to tracing the course of minute innocuous granules, such as India ink and carmine, from the peritoneal cavity into their more remote places of lodgment. This series of experiments unquestionably demonstrated that any foreign

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