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Article
January 30, 1904

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE SYMPATHETIC IN RELATION TO THE EYE.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(5):286-287. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490500006001a
Abstract

[Dr. de Schweinitz reviewed the entire literature pertaining to the subject, and from this review and the various opinions of the authors quoted thought the following conclusions might be drawn:]

1. Although lachrymal secretion may be caused by excitation of the sympathetic, and increased lachrymation by section of the cervical sympathetic or removal of the superior cervical ganglion, the sympathetic itself should not be considered the nerve of secretion for the lachrymal gland.

2. Dilatation of the pupil is probably caused by contraction of a set of radially arranged muscular or contractile fibers, the so-called dilatator pupillæ, which is supplied by the sympathetic, and by inhibition of the sphincter of the iris. The dilating impulse transmitted to the iris passes through the cervical sympathetic and in general terms along the mydriatic tract of the pupil, which proceeds from a center in the medulla as far as the second dorsal

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