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Article
January 30, 1904

A CASE OF ANGINA AND DYSPHAGIAILLUSTRATING THE VALUE OF ANTISYPHILITIC TREATMENT IN A CONDITION MISTAKEN FOR EPITHELIOMA.

Author Affiliations

Formerly Adjunct Professor of Laryngology in the Philadelphia Polyclinic and School for Graduates. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(5):309-310. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490500029002
Abstract

History.  —Mrs. X., a widow, about 35 years of age. Her husband died of pulmonary tuberculosis about 18 months before I saw her. She nursed him during his illness, and in consequence of much loss of rest, and of the great physical and mental strain, her health had been much impaired. In the year following, however, she had apparently regained her health and strength. She was a brunette, well nourished, and physically well developed, of a bilious temperament and of active habits. The account of her ailment, for which she sought the advice of the late Dr. Thomas G. Morton, was that for the last six months she had experienced great pain in swallowing, even on the attempt to drink a little milk or water. Otherwise her health had been good. She thought that she had lost a few pounds in weight, which she attributed to her inability to take

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