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Article
January 30, 1904

NERVE FIBERS AS PATHWAYS FOR TOXINS, AND THE TREATMENT OF TETANUS.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(5):312-313. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02490500032004
Abstract

A short time ago we called attention to the significant experiments of Meltzer, who found that if a nerve is ligated in one point and the animal injected with methylene blue, the nerve becomes stained throughout, but that if the nerve is ligated in two places the intervening portion remains unstained. From this it may be inferred that whatever fluids enter the neurons, whether food or poison, enter from the extremities of the neurons and not from the blood vessels coursing along the nerve. It must be, therefore, that there is a continuous streaming within the substance of the axis cylinders, perhaps allied to the streaming of the protoplasm that occurs in the cells of certain plants and lower animals, by which means substances may be transported along the axis cylinders. As the myelin sheath seems to be a rather impervious structure, it may explain the failure of substances in

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