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Article
February 24, 1906

THE PHYSIOLOGIC AND LEGAL STATUS OF THE FETUS IN UTERO.

Author Affiliations

Health Officer of Alabama. MONTGOMERY, ALA.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(8):551-553. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510350001001
Abstract

The two most important events connected with a life-history are its beginning and ending.

Embryology has persistently sought to discover and to interpret the earliest manifestations of the former, while pathology, with equal tenacity of purpose, has endeavored to ascertain the causes and incidents of the latter. So far as the beginning of a life-cycle is concerned, embryology has thoroughly established the doctrines of gamogenesis and agamogenesis, the former being the rule among the higher orders of plants and animals, the latter among the lower orders. Reproduction among human beings must, therefore, obey the law of gamogenesis; hence, two ancestors—male and female —contribute to the origin of every new member of the human race, the contributing elements being spermatozoon and ovum, respectively.

While these germ-cells possess inherent vitality and motor power, especially the spermatozoon, neither one can separately and alone evolve itself into a higher or more complex morphologic entity.

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