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Article
February 24, 1906

THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AND THE ADVANTAGES IT OFFERS TO THE YOUNG PRACTITIONER.

Author Affiliations

Assistant Surgeon-General, U. S. Army, Chief Surgeon Department of the Lakes. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(8):578-580. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510350028001g

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Abstract

Medical students and young practitioners should be acquainted with the advantages to be gained by entering the Medical Department of the Army, and a brief survey of the subject may prove of interest and benefit to them, as well as reciprocally beneficial to the service, by drawing to it desirable candidates.

Representatives of the Medical Corps of the Navy and of the Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service have described the advantages to be derived from entering their respective services. While these undoubtedly offer attractions equal in degree to those held out by the Army, it is proper that all sides of the question should be presented in order that a young physician who makes up his mind to enter one of the public services may make his choice according to his taste and temperament. I shall endeavor to give a plain, unvarnished statement of facts concerning the Medical Corps of

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