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Article
February 13, 1904

THE INFLUENCE OF RESECTION OF THE CERVICAL SYMPATHETIC GANGLIA IN GLAUCOMA.

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, Rush Medical College, University of Chicago; Professor of Ophthalmology, Chicago Policlinic; Surgeon to the Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(7):425-430. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490520015001d
Abstract

REPORT OF 61 ADDITIONAL OPERATIONS OF EXCISION OF SUPERIOR CERVICAL SYMPATHETIC GANGLION FOR GLAUCOMA.  Reports of these cases were sent to me through the kindness of the observers in response to the circular letter referred to. Lack of space prevents the publication of many of the details, but these have appeared in the Transactions of the Section on Ophthalmology of the American Medical Association.

JAMES MOORES BALL. THREE CASES OF GLAUCOMA. FOUR OPERATIONS.1  No. 8.—Absolute glaucoma of right. M., aged 36, with R.V.=P. 1. L. V=20/70. T.+3. After right sympathectomy tension fell to +1. Relief from pain for one year.Nos. 9 and 10.—Simple glaucoma of both in woman aged 43. R.V.=0. T.+3. L.V=P.l. T.+. Left sympathectomy, June 15, 1899, was followed by improvement in tension and vision. L. V=F. 5 ft. T.n. Rt. sympathectomy, July 16, 1899, with temporary improvement in vision and tension. R. V.= hand movements. T.+l.

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