[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.112.64. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 18, 1897

ABNORMAL RESPIRATION IN INFANTS FROM OBSTRUCTION IN THE UPPER AIR PASSAGE.

Author Affiliations

PHYSICIAN FOR DISEASES OF CHILDREN, NORTHWESTERN DISPENSARY; LARYNGOLOGIST, ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S CLINIC; ASSISTANT SURGEON, N. Y. EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY. NEW YORK, N. Y.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(25):1252-1257. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440510014001e

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

Normal infantile respiration in sleep is quiet, noiseless, save for the soft low inspiratory murmur, always nasal, chiefly diaphragmatic. During the first month its rhythm is irregular, there are frequent pauses and at times it is deeper, as in the Cheyne-Stokes variety. Its rate varies from 30 to 45. At the end of the third year it is regular and has a rate of 24. The rhythm is changed by very slight impressions. The movements seen are the ample ones of the abdomen, the lesser ones of the thorax and those of the nasal alæ. There is no drawing in of the fleshy portions of the thorax, the mouth is closed and the act of nursing can be completed without interruption.

Widely differing in its symptoms from that due to pulmonary or bronchial affections, abnormal respiration from obstructions in the upper air tracts is more difficult to trace to its

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×