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Article
July 20, 1895

THE CAPACITY OF MEDICINE.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF DERMATOLOGY, COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(3):95-99. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430290009001d

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Abstract

The man is fortunate who has a high conception of his life work. In this respect, at least as regards the humanitarian aims of his profession, the doctor is usually fortunate. I believe it is the rule that the doctor has a conscious pride in the high purposes of his profession; I believe it can be said, without exaggeration and without straining the truth, that the doctor usually approaches his work with a realizing sense of his duties and of his heavy responsibilities. Often—oftener I believe than most men—he is animated by lofty ideals and sustained in a career of heavy responsibilities and, perhaps, unrewarded endeavors by the approval of his own conscience for doing, as well as in him lies, the work that comes to his hands. I believe, too, it can be said with truth, that he does not usually have to depend upon the approval of his

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