[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 3, 1895

THE NECESSITIES OF A MODERN MEDICAL COLLEGE.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF LARYNGOLOGY AND DISEASES OF THE CHEST, RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE, CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(5):173-176. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430310001001

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

In the early history of this country, and as late as fifty or perhaps even twenty-five years ago, large tracts of sparsely settled portions of the United States presented conditions in which it was impossible for the thoroughly educated medical man to obtain a just recompense for the time and money necessarily expended in acquiring his medical education, yet these communities required the services of physicians, and it therefore happened that persons with very slight qualifications took up the practice of physic and endeavored to supply the demands of the community that was unable to obtain anything better.

With increase in population, wealth and civilization the people became more discriminating in their choice of doctors, the communication with distant points was more rapid, the advent of railroads made it easier to secure competent medical men, and consequently the poorly qualified doctors have gradually decreased until at present there are few

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×