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Article
August 3, 1895

ERASION, EXCISION AND AMPUTATION IN JOINT DISEASE.

Author Affiliations

CLINICAL PROFESSOR ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA; SURGEON PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, ETC.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(5):182-186. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430310010002a

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Abstract

From failure of early diagnosis, from lack of early treatment, and from the neglect of early protection and fixation of inflamed joint surfaces, or on account of the intensity of the tubercular process, a large number of cases of tubercular joint disease still require operative procedures for the safety of the limb or the life of the affected individual. Fortunately, owing to a better appreciation of the conditions, these cases are becoming rare; it being more generally recognized that destructive results are preventable by early treatment; that is, by long-continued protection secured by rest and by effective mechanical devices. Proper management of these cases will result in the saving of a large number of these joints, even if the tubercular bacillus has secured a foothold in the osseous structures adjacent to the joint itself.

Much will depend upon the joint invaded; but the same principles of treatment will apply to

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