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Article
March 31, 1906

THE EFFECT OF ROENTGEN RAYS ON THE BLOODFORMING ORGANS.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(13):959-960. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.02510400037008
Abstract

At first there was a tendency to deny or to doubt that the Roentgen ray had any special effect on internal organs or processes, but two practically simultaneous yet independent events showed that this assumption was wholly without foundation. The first of these events in point of time was the observation of the remarkable effect of Roentgen rays on the course of pseudoleukemia and leukemia (Pusey, Senn, Brown and others), to the treatment of which they were applied in a more or less empirical way. The second event was the demonstration by Heinecke (1903-4) of the elective destructive action of the rays on the lymphoid tissues in the spleen, lymph nodes and bone marrow.

In this country the effect of the Roentgen rays on the blood-forming organs has been studied especially by Warthin,1 who combines experimental work with the study of material from leukemic patients treated with Roentgen irradiation.

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