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Article
September 21, 1895

THE EARLY HISTORY OF VAGINAL HYSTERECTOMY.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PRACTICE OF SURGERY AND CLINICAL SURGERY, RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE; PROFESSOR OF SURGERY, CHICAGO POLICLINIC; ATTENDING SURGEON PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL; SURGEON-IN-CHIEF ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(12):476-482. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430380006002
Abstract

Every great operation in surgery has a period of evolution of varying duration. Each marked advance in medicine and surgery is preceded by attempts which led to the elucidation of old ideas or the conception of new ones. All great discoveries are overshadowed by the labors of a host of earnest and progressive workers which ultimately crown the efforts of a favored few. Nearly all of the improvements in medicine and surgery which have characterized the present progressive age are only a repetition of the work of our professional ancestors. Many a so-called modern operation is only a recent and not always an improved edition of the operative technique as devised and described by one of the old masters. These remarks apply with special force to vaginal hysterectomy. The operation of removing the carcinomatous uterus through the vagina, so recently developed to its present state of perfection, was planned and

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