[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.147.211.117. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 19, 1906

THE PHARMACOPEIA AND THE PHYSICIAN.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(20):1523-1526. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510470037002
Abstract

CHAPTER XXI. 

DRUGS ACTING ON THE SKIN AND MUCOUS MEMBRANE, MAINLY WITH REFERENCE TO EXTERNAL USE.  There are so many substances which have been used as irritants under varying conditions that we can not attempt to do more than mention the more useful of the agents frequently employed for this purpose, together with some of the conditions in which clinical experience has shown them to be most beneficial.While the employment of counter-irritants is almost wholly empirical, the regions of the skin which Brunton has indicated for their use when it is desired to influence the internal organs correspond well with those which Head has shown to exhibit tenderness of the skin in connection with diseases of the same organs.Brunton directs the irritant to be placed over the larynx, ovaries or sciatic nerve for affections of those parts, over the ensiform cartilage for gastric disturbance, above and below the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×