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May 19, 1906

THE VITALITY OF THE TYPHOID BACILLUS IN FLOWING WATERS.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(20):1532. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.02510470046011

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Abstract

The contention made in the Chicago drainage canal suit that typhoid germs are short lived in natural flowing waters seems to be supported by some recent experiments made at the hygienic laboratory of the University of Wisconsin. According to the accounts received, the attempt was made to test the question under as nearly the natural conditions as possible, and the results seem to show that in ordinary flowing water the germs live only from eight to ten days, while in sewage polluted water they live scarcely half that time, being apparently killed off by other organisms. In fact, it is only the more resistant minority of the germs that reach the ten days' limit, and the experiments are said to have been remarkably uniform in this respect. While there may be exceptional cases of longevity of the typhoid bacillus, particularly in culture experiments, the evidence is accumulating that it is

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