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April 2, 1904

THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF EOSINOPHILES IN THE SPUTUM.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(14):897. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02490590031012
Abstract

Since their discovery by Wharton Jones, the coarsely granular leucocytes, now known as eosinophiles, have attracted a good deal of attention. In recent years their increase in the blood in certain diseases, and particularly in diseases caused by intestinal parasites, has led to renewed activity in their investigation. The increase of these cells in the sputum in asthma, and their relation to the Charcot-Leyden crystals, have been repeatedly discussed. In diseases of the lung, other than asthma, various observers also have described either an increase or a lack of eosinophiles. In general, there has been an agreement among these authors that the eosinophiles are increased in asthma and bronchitis and decreased in tuberculosis, so that in cases of suspected tuberculosis, in which tubercle bacilli could not be found, an absence of eosinophiles from the sputum was thought to favor a diagnosis of tuberculosis. Some writers have, however, persistently asserted that

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