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May 26, 1906

THE PHARMACOPEIA AND THE PHYSICIAN.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(21):1609-1611. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510480037002
Abstract

CHAPTER XXII. 

Vesicants.  Vesication is the result of greater irritation than that which merely causes rubefaction. The exudate from the blood vessels is not absorbed, but collects beneath the horny layer of the skin, which it can not penetrate, but which it separates from the layers beneath. Such collections of fluid are called vesicles or blisters, and the agents which produce them are termed epispastics, vesicants or "blisters".If the vesicle is ruptured soon after it has formed, and the horny layer removed, it leaves a tender surface of the skin exposed; this is irritated even by contact with the air, and, being easily permeated, it is liable to infection, hence it is better to puncture the blister with a sterile needle inserted at the periphery; the fluid is allowed to escape while the loose layer of epidermis is left in place for protection until a new hard layer is

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