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Article
June 2, 1906

THE PHARMACOPEIA AND THE PHYSICIAN.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(22):1690-1693. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510490036002

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Abstract

CHAPTER XXIII. 

DRUGS ACTING LOCALLY ON THE SKIN AND MUCOUS MEMBRANES. 

Local Anesthetics and Anodynes.  The introduction of cocain marked a decided advance in the production of local anesthesia.Previous to that, freezing the part by immersion in a mixture of salt and snow, or shaved ice, or by spraying with ether or other volatile liquid, was used, and while a procedure of this kind does produce complete anesthesia, the pain experienced during the freezing and thawing greatly exceeds that which would be caused by such a simple operation as opening an abscess or the removal of a small foreign body, such as a splinter or piece of glass, when readily accessible. It is because of the inherent dread which the average person has of the surgeon's knife, that he will undergo suffering akin to that with which he is familiar, rather than endure a lesser one which seems dreadful

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