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Article
June 16, 1906

PRETUBERCULAR CONDITIONS AND THE TREATMENT OF ASSOCIATED ANEMIA BY HYPODERMIC INJECTIONS OF IRON AND ARSENIC.

Author Affiliations

Lecturer on Laryngology, Detroit College of Medicine; Laryngologist, Harper and Childrens' Free Hospitals; Attending Physician, Woman's Hospital. DETROIT.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(24):1833-1835. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.62510510025002c
Abstract

It is a well-recognized fact that pulmonary tuberculosis is the cause of more deaths than any other one disease, except pneumonia. In the state of Michigan our mortality record for some years has averaged above 2,500, while in Detroit our last report shows that 327 individuals died from this cause. We are all familiar with the fact that nearly one-seventh of all persons die of tuberculosis, and more than 50 per cent. of the remainder give postmortem evidences of tuberculous foci that had remained dormant or succumbed entirely to the antitoxic properties of our cells.

If this latter astounding and well-conceded fact is true, seven out of ten individuals that reach late adult life have been infected with tuberculosis.

The profession and the laity are awakened to the stupendous problem at hand. Many of us appreciate our inefficiency in battling with the ravages of this disease. We are especially apt

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