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Article
June 16, 1906

THE EMOTIONS AS FACTORS IN THE ETIOLOGY OF DISEASE.

JAMA. 1906;XLVI(24):1845. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.02510510037006
Abstract

Although the mechanism may not be clear, it is generally recognized that emotional states constitute a distinct and definite factor in the etiology of a number of morbid affections. This relation is observed more especially, though not exclusively, in connection with disorders involving the nervous system. Even apart from disease, various phenomena appear in the train of emotional influences. Among the more common of these are tremor or muscular twitching, vasomotor spasm (pallor) or paresis (blushing), cardiac inhibition (syncope) or release of normal cardiac inhibition (tachycardia, palpitation), horripilation, secretory disturbances (hyperidrosis, anidrosis, involuntary discharges). No definite and constant relation exists between the character of the emotional disturbance and the resulting manifestations. An interesting presentation of some effects of fright is contained in a communication read recently before the Bristol Medico-Chirurgical Society by Dr. J. R. Charles,1 but many of the statements made therein are applicable also to other forms

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