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Article
July 7, 1906

Case Teaching in Medicine. A Series of Graduated Exercises in the Differential Diagnosis. Prognosis and Treatment of Actual Cases of Disease.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(1):62-63. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.02520010070023

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Abstract

This little book has the merit of being novel. It is not intended to take the place of bedside work or ordinary clinical instruction, but to give the student training in the interpretation of facts. The successful physician, of course, has to learn, first, to see things, and, second, to interpret what he sees. The exercises in this book are designed to train him in the latter ability. As Cabot puts it, "After the student has learned to open his eyes and see, he must learn to shut them and think." If rightly used, the book will be a valuable help in training students to correct and logical thinking. The case histories are concisely yet clearly given, with just enough of the leading points omitted, and enough misleading facts included to exercise the student in the ability to disregard the non-essentials and to seek by still further questioning for the

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