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Article
April 30, 1904

ROUTINE METHOD OF DETECTING AND DIFFERENTIATING REDUCING AGENTS FOUND IN THE URINE.

Author Affiliations

FORT MADISON, IOWA.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(18):1125-1127. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490630011001d
Abstract

It is my purpose in this paper briefly to call attention to a few well-established facts, point out some of the fallacies of our principal tests and outline a reliable and simple course of procedure for the differentiation of the various reducing agents which may appear in the urine. Most of the tests ordinarily employed are good negative tests, but to accept a positive reaction without confirmation is a frequent source of error in diagnosis, as I shall point out.

While, as a rule, we are called on to determine the presence or absence of dextrose, occasionally it is very important to determine whether or not other carbohydrates, as well as some other compounds, are present in the urine. Without exact confirmatory tests, it is practically impossible to definitely determine the presence or absence of dextrose. It is a rule with many physicians to depend on one single test for sugar

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