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Article
February 20, 1897

AN IDEAL SUTURE FOR THE CLOSING OF ABDOMINAL INCISIONS, CUTS ON THE HANDS, FACE AND BODY GENERALLY.

Author Affiliations

BATTLE CREEK, MICH.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(8):346-347. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440080012002a

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Abstract

The ideal suture is one that, first, can be most readily and easily introduced; second, that holds the parts in perfect apposition with the least possible interference to the circulation of or at the edges of the wound; third, that is the least apt to become septic; fourth, that requires the least possible amount of suture material; fifth, that leaves the least possible scar; sixth, that can be relied upon to fulfill these requirements and after fulfilling them, can be removed.

The old interrupted en masse suture, while fulfilling the first requirement of introduction well enough, utterly fails in all the rest except the last, viz.: removal, for by including the tissues from one-half to one inch on each side of the wound and tying them, the circulation is materially interfered with, thus preventing healing and promoting sepsis by reducing the blood supply and depriving nature of its best means

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