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Article
July 28, 1906

OCCURRENCE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF EXTRADURAL BLOOD CLOT IN BURNED BODIES.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(4):276. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.02520040032004
Abstract

Burned bodies often present serious problems the solution of which is beset with great difficulties. In the case of a burned human body the medicolegal examiner may be called on to determine whether death was due to burns or whether the burns occurred after death and, in the latter instance, whether death resulted from natural or unnatural causes. It is not proposed at this time to discuss these questions in their larger aspects, but merely to call attention to the occasional occurrence in burned bodies of extradural blood clot, an occurrence that has attracted notice only of recent years. So long ago as 1860 Hölder first described extradural extravasations of blood in two burned bodies and ascribed them to postmortem processes, but his observations seem to have escaped notice completely. In 1882 Zillner1 observed a mass of clotted blood over each convexity in a man whose body had been

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