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Article
May 14, 1904

THE MEDICAL PROFESSIONIN THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE LIFE OF AMERICA.

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(20):1283-1287. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490650017002d
Abstract

The delivery of an address before the Army Medical School, while a pleasant distinction for which I am grateful to the surgeon general, involves, nevertheless, a responsibility that I approach with conscious diffidence. This feeling of trepidation arises, in part at least, from the fact that, as a professional man engaged however, in civil practice, I find myself surrounded by new conditions that are provocative of new thoughts and suggestive of new problems. Thus, for instance, there comes quite naturally to my mind the thought that the medical profession, wherever taught, avowed or practiced, presents the phenomena of a certain unity, a certain solidarity; but that, as exemplified, respectively, in public and private, military and civil practice, it presents important variations, and finally, that the causes of the variations and the reciprocal relations of the variants must be matters of interesting if not important consideration. This same

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